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Bakan, J. (2004). The corporation: The pathological pursuit of profit and power. New York: Free Press.

Reviewed by: Richard Phillipps

Joel Bakan is professor of law at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, and a former Rhodes Scholar. In this work he explores what the modern corporation as an institution is, and doesnt like what he finds.

Chapter 1 charts the corporations rise to world dominance from the late 17th century in England. From the start it was engulfed in corruption and fraud, he says ? 93 companies flourished between 1690 and 1695 but by 1698, only 20 remained. Despite the huge number of corporate collapses in the years since then, Bakan points out, it is unthinkable that any government would seek to ban this form of doing business ? it is such a useful way of raising capital and employing people.

Purchase information: This book is available from all good booksellers, or can be purchased direct from the publisher at: http://www.simonsays.com/content/book.cfm?sid=33&pid=505005

About the reviewer: Dr Richard Phillipps is currently a Visiting Fellow atBond University, Australia. From 1987 to 2004hetaught public relations, organisational communication, and advertising at University of Western Sydney, andbefore that worked inpublic relations and advertisingin Sydney. From 1974 to 1986 he was the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's senior information officer and staff newspaper editor. Richardalso has extensive experience as a journalist.Heis a fellow of the Public Relations Institute of Australia and a member of several other professional associations, including the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication and the International Association for Media and Communication Research.

Richard's PhD explored the role of media advisors in political communication.He has also given conference papers on the cooperative movement, parliamentary question time, environmental issues, political advertising, media representations ofAborigines, campaigns directed at young voters, and the police and the media.

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